Colloques et séminaires 2015

Language Diversity in the Sinophone World: Policies, effects, and tradition International Symposium Göttingen University 11 – 13 June 2015


Mis à jour : 20 Fév 2015

Center for Modern East Asian Studies

Description

Language diversity is a ubiquitous feature in the sinophone world. In the past and present, language planning agencies in the area commonly – if not uncontroversially – referred to as “Greater China” have responded differently to the challenges of multilingualism. After several decades of national language policy, Mandarin is now widely used and broadly accepted in Mainland China, Singapore, and Taiwan. It is used to a much lesser degree in Hong Kong and Macao, where Cantonese, the major regional language, arguably enjoys a higher prestige than other so‐called “dialects” elsewhere. At the same time, there are notable differences with regard to international language planning – most important, the incorporation of English into school curricula and/or the acceptance of English as an official language.

One purpose of the symposium is to bring together scholars who are working on language planning and official responses to language diversity. Another purpose is to compare the effects of language planning and the manifestations of language diversity in the daily lives of the speakers. Lastly, we aim at situating the conference theme in a historical context. The reason behind this historical contextualization is to find out to what extent language-related phenomena are imbedded in Chinese traditions, and to what extent they can be accounted for by analytical approaches that are not bound to Chinese culture and/or history. Topics include language contact phenomena (e.g., code mixing), multilingualism in classrooms, language variation and language use in the media, and nonofficial language ideologies and activities of language revivalist groups.

Venue
Göttingen University, Historical Observatory

Local organizers and contact persons
Henning Klöter
Julia Schulz

If you wish to attend the conference, please contact us before 20 May 2015 at Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

Speakers and papers (working titles)

Wolfgang Behr (University of Zurich)
Speaking Beasts and Beastly Tongues: On the Boundaries of ‘Language’ in Early and Early Medieval China

Chen Su-chiao (National Taiwan University of Science and Technology)
Language Policy and Practice in Taiwan in the Age of Globalization

Feng Anwei (University of Nottingham, Ningbo)
Language Policy Informed by Additive Trilingualism in Context

Goh Yeng Seng (National Institute of Education, Singapore / Nanyang Technological University)
Teaching Chinese to English-Dominant Bilinguals: A Singapore Model

Henning Klöter (Göttingen University)
Language debates in China and Taiwan in the 1930s: Actors, ideologies and arguments

David S.C. Li (Hong Kong Institute of Education)
Hong Kong and Macau

Lin Chin-hui (Göttingen University)
Pragmatics in Contact: On the Origins of the Taiwan Mandarin Particle ê

Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania)
Multilingualism in Chinese History

Christiane Meierkord (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)
Interactions Across Englishes in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macao, Singapore and Taiwan

Martin Mellech (Göttingen University)
Language Choice in Taiwanese Daily Soaps

Julia Schulz (Göttingen University)
English-Chinese Language Contact in Taiwan

Peter Siemund (University of Hamburg / University of Calgary)
How Multilingual are Singaporeans Really? A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Multilingualism Amongst University and Polytechnic Students in Singapore

Donald Snow (Duke Kunshan University)
Missionaries, Romanization, and Southern Min: Outsider Groups and the Promotion of Written Chinese Vernaculars

Su Hsi-yao (National Taiwan Normal University)
The Discourses of lao Yingwen (撂英文): Language Ideologies Concerning English Code‐Mixing in Taiwan

Jeroen Wiedenhof (Leiden University)
Diverse Language, Uniform Grammars? The Case of Mandarin Chinese

Doreen Wu (Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
Multilingualism in Hong Kong Media

Xu Daming (Nanjing University/University of Macau)
Is Chinese One Language?

Zhou Minglang (University of Maryland)
Globalization of Chinese: A Global Putonghua?

The symposium is sponsored by the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation of International Scholarly Exchange.